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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

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10.000 8000
—           3-Ch,
1000 I   800
•Madagascar •Malawi 3 Mauritania
5-Molam 6-Niger
9-Sierra Leor OSouiliAlrn HnodS! 2-Sudan 3-Tanganyiki •Togo
G-Uganda 7 United Ara
9-Alghanistai 0-Burma
nbodia 2Ceylon 3 China ITai,
Middle East (19691
34-Hong Kong 3b India 3G.lndont,s,o 37-lron 38-Jopan 39-Koraa, Ret)
40 Mm
I Wei
•H.6?"62 I1963I.,8
50-Lebanon
61 -Saudi Ar
52-Syna
63-Turkev
54-Argentin
55 Bolivia
56Br»!il
B7.Chilu
58-ColQmbn
59-Costa RII
60-Oominici
61-Ecuador
62-EISalvad
63-Guotcmo
8« -Guyana
65-Hani
69-Nicaragua 70-Panama 71-Paraguay 72-Peru 73-Puerto Rico
75-Uruguay 76-Vangiuela 77 Belgium
79-Germany. Fed 80- Italy 81-Netrnrlands
83-Denmark
87-Switzerland 88-United Kmgdurr 89-n inland 80-Greece
94 New Ze 95-Canada 96-Unind
ISO       200                           400                                     1000
PER CAPITA GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT [$)
Figure 3. Per capita-energy use and GNP, 1965 (excluding communist countries). Sources:  GNP (12), Energy-Resources for the Future tabulations.
As water of high quality and adequate supply and regularity of flow becomes scarcer, increasing public controls will be required, and increasing costs will be encountered in meeting the problems. The polluting industries face higher costs for chemical treatment, settlement ponds, cooling towers,and lakes. New plant species may be more vulnerable to disease or drought.